bring, take

bring, take
Bring indicates movement toward a place identified with the speaker; it suggests "to come here with." Take suggests movement away from such a place and indicates "to go there with." One takes money to a supermarket and brings home groceries (and no money). In ordinary usage, these words are often interchanged, but the distinction just noted persists to a degree. You can take or bring someone to a party, take or bring someone to have lunch, but the word selected has some bearing upon the relationship to the speaker of the place involved in the action.
     Both bring and take combine with many prepositions to form phrases with distinct meanings: "bring about," "bring around," "bring down," "bring forward," "bring in," "bring off," "bring on," "bring out," "bring over," "bring to," "bring up"; "take aback," "take after," "take apart," "take back," "take for," "take on," "take over," "take to," "take up." Each word also appears in many trite expressions, normally to be avoided."Take it lying down," "take it on the chin," "take aback seat," and "take five" are examples. So, too, are "bring to an end, '" a wordy expression since end conveys the full idea, as it does in "put an end to" and "come to an end." The cliché "bring to a head" is really an unpleasant expression, as well as being trite and wordy: it means "to cause pus to form." Why not say, instead, precipitate or crystallize?"Bring to a boil" and "bring to a climax" are less unpleasant but equally trite expressions.

Dictionary of problem words and expressions. . 1975.

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  • bring - take - fetch — ◊ bring If you bring someone or something with you when you come to a place, you have them with you. He would have to bring Judy with him. Please bring your calculator to every lesson. The past tense and past participle of bring is brought. My… …   Useful english dictionary

  • bring — W1S1 [brıŋ] v past tense and past participle brought [bro:t US bro:t] [T] [: Old English; Origin: bringan] 1.) a) to take something or someone with you to the place where you are now, or to the place you are talking about →↑take ▪ Did you bring… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • bring — bring, take The essential difference between these two words corresponds to that between come and go, and is intuitive to a native speaker: bring implies movement towards, and take movement away from, the person speaking: Take your bike and bring …   Modern English usage

  • take — bring, take The essential difference between these two words corresponds to that between come and go, and is intuitive to a native speaker: bring implies movement towards, and take movement away from, the person speaking: Take your bike and bring …   Modern English usage

  • bring — bring, take, fetch are comparable but not interchangeable when used in the sense of to convey from one place to another. Bring implies carrying, leading, or transporting from a distance to the point where the speaker or agent is or will be; take …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • bring somebody down a peg (or two) — ˌbring/ˌtake sb ˈdown a peg (or two) idiom to make sb realize that they are not as good, important, etc. as they think they are • He needed to be taken down a peg or two. Main entry: ↑pegidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • take somebody down a peg (or two) — ˌbring/ˌtake sb ˈdown a peg (or two) idiom to make sb realize that they are not as good, important, etc. as they think they are • He needed to be taken down a peg or two. Main entry: ↑pegidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • bring — verb /brIN/ past tense and past participle brought /brO:t/ (T) 1 to take someone or something to the place you are now, to the place you are going to, or to the place that you have been talking about: Did you bring anything to drink? | Sheila was …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • bring */*/*/ — UK [brɪŋ] / US verb [transitive] Word forms bring : present tense I/you/we/they bring he/she/it brings present participle bringing past tense brought UK [brɔːt] / US [brɔt] past participle brought Collocations: If you bring, take, or fetch… …   English dictionary

  • bring*/*/*/ — [brɪŋ] (past tense and past participle brought [brɔːt] ) verb [T] 1) to take someone or something with you from one place to another Bring a coat in case it turns cold.[/ex] I brought that book for you.[/ex] Could you bring me a plate from the… …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

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